Please take a moment to follow this link to complete a survey about skateboard sizes.

Alternatively, you can navigate to the survey by copying and pasting the following URL to your browser's address bar:

Monday, February 13, 2012

Weights and Measures

I've decided to publish for everybody's viewing pleasure my tables of weights and measures for various skate parts. I use precise equipment to take these measurements. An official USPS-approved postal scale is used to take all weight measurements. I use micrometers and precise rulers to measure all lengths.

Trucks are measured with all hardware. In some cases, the average of the two trucks in a set is used.

Here is the link.

Enjoy!

7 comments:

  1. good work Mr. Bertrand :)

    I'm asking my self... are light-weight trucks change the way of skating or is it all just a "head (psychological) thing"?

    btw, I also owned the Ace 44 - ain't the 44s not only 8.25" axle to axle?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I don't think it is a psychological thing, at least not wholly.

      I think the lightweight trucks help lighter skaters or more highly technical skaters. I'm 220 pounds, so weight is less of a hindrance. I actually like the feeling of heavier trucks. I have one of those 4 D-Cell mag light flashlights that I use when I walk the dog at night. With all the batteries in the flashlight, it feels good to flip it around in my hands. The heft of it feels "right". If I take all the batteries out, the flashlight is very light, and flipping it is different: the flashlight reacts faster, it spins faster, but without the heft, I have to pay closer attention to small movements that could upset the balance before the flip. I notice the same effect with lighter trucks. The lighter ones rotate easier and rotate faster, but they don't tolerate small variations in forces. Heavier trucks rotate slower, but have a higher tolerance for variations in forces.

      It could be said that a few grams can't make that much difference. Maybe not in ollie height. But on flip tricks, a few grams can make a big difference in angular momentum. The less mass there is, the less force required to get the same acceleration. This means you can flip a light truck faster with the same strength. Faster flips gives more time in the air to do other things, like adding a varial or another flip, or to place the feet for the landing.

      A skater could get accustomed to light trucks with low inertia and fast angular acceleration, provided their muscles stayed fine tuned and their reaction times stayed quick. It is my general observation that light trucks require more precision before, during, and after the trick. They're less forgiving of foot placement and body position.

      Delete
    2. The Ace 44s would be 8.25" on the axle if the axles weren't so dang long. I have 2 threads showing on each side when I bolt my wheels up to the point of a little bit of side-to-side movement I prefer. I usually have no threads showing past the axle nuts. Those 4 threads measure to .25".

      Delete
  2. Hey Bertrand- can you describe what the various columns mean in your kickass table? Thanks!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Sure!
      Brand - the brand of the truck
      Model - the model name/number, plus notes for some of the variations I play with
      PS - this is a temporary field being used as a scoring mechanism
      Truck Size Class - This is the "class" of the truck size. Size classes don't always line up with actual sizes. Most trucks in the "5.75/149" class measure around 146-147mm at the hanger. The size classes are 4.25/109, 5.0/129, 5.25/139, 5.5/14?, 5.75/149, 6.0/159, 6.25/169, 215.
      Hanger Width, mm - the measured width of the hanger in millimeters
      Hanger Width, inches - the measured width of the hanger in inches
      Nominal Axle width, inches - how wide the manufacturer claims the truck is at the ends of the axle.
      Actual Axle width, inches - the actual measured width of the truck at the axle ends.
      Axle width, mm - the actual measured or converted width of the truck at the axle ends in millimeters.
      Weight, g - the measured weight of the truck in grams. The truck is weighed with all parts, typically consisting of: hanger, baseplate, pivot bushing, kingpin bushings, all kingpin washers, kingpin nut, all axle washers, all axle nuts. Some truck companies weigh their trucks without axle nuts, some truck companies weigh just the hanger and baseplate. Independent weighs their trucks with everything on them. Many truck companies don't even make weight claims for their trucks.
      Height, mm - this is the calculated height of the axle at the center of the axle, the calculation is the average of 4 measured distances:
      Ll - the distance from a flat surface to the bottom of the axle end on the left side
      Lh - the distance from a flat surface to the top of the axle end on the left side
      Rl- the distance from a flat surface to the bottom of the axle end on the right side
      Rh - the distance from a flat surface to the top of the axle end on the right side
      Axle Placement - the calculated distance of center of the axle to the kingpin side truck mounting holes. This measurement gives a feel for what your axle-to-axle wheelbase will be, as well as what it will feel like pressing down on the nose or tail. The higher this number, the further toward the end of the board the axle sits. The further the axle sits, the harder the force necessary to pop the nose or tail.
      ap, LI - distance from the kingpin-side truck mounting holes to the front of the axle on the Left side
      ap, LO - distance from the kingpin-side truck mounting holes to the back of the axle on the Left side
      ap, RI - distance from the kingpin-side truck mounting holes to the front of the axle on the Right side
      ap, RO - distance from the kingpin-side truck mounting holes to the front of the axle on the Right side
      Notes - Notes

      Delete
  3. Thankyou! Having ridden various setups (coming bk to skating after 10 yr break) on transition and street - no it's not just psychological. Those titanium trucks are great, some tricks I just can't do with a heavier setup

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. ..that said it's also what you're used to. Body seems to attenuate to board weight

      Delete