Please take a moment to follow this link to complete a survey about skateboard sizes.

Alternatively, you can navigate to the survey by copying and pasting the following URL to your browser's address bar:

Saturday, March 24, 2012

Theeve Trucks Review: Part 6

At long last, I have in my possession a set of Theeve TiH trucks in size 5.85. These are Theeve's flagship trucks. At over $100 a set, these trucks are at least double the cost of most trucks out there. You can get 3 sets of Venture trucks for the price of one set of Theeve TiH. From the previous five parts (part one, two, three, four, and five) of this test, we've seen that Theeve trucks are serious high performance skateboard trucks. Many skaters have converted from using Independents to using Theeves - this says a lot about the reputation these trucks have built in the few years they've been on the market. I myself once always turned to Independent trucks to get the job done until I started riding Theeves. Theeves are my go-to truck for pretty much anything I want to skate. Skaters tend to prefer the TiAX Theeves, considering them a good tradeoff between affordability and performance. With the TiAX, a skater gets a solid, strong, well-turning truck with class-leading light weight. Some skaters buy the CSX version, which are typically heavier than their counterparts from other truck manufacturers, but they still get Bones bushings standard and the great turning and stability Theeve trucks are known for.


The TiH version of Theeve trucks is the raison d'etre (reason for being) for the Theeve truck designed a few years ago by Trevor Ward of Australia. Trevor wanted a truck that turned extremely well, felt stable on
center and at set points, and took full advantage of modern design techniques and materials. Theeve trucks are designed using modern computer-aided design software and use advanced manufacturing techniques and materials to build the trucks. The TiH baseplate is made of the same 6/4 titanium allow as the rest of the Theeve line, while the hanger is constructed of one solid piece of titanium. The hanger is cast in Theeve's titanium alloy blend, then the axles (yes, two axles, one per side) are precision machined and died (threaded) to exacting specifications. I've already observed before that Theeve's manufacturing quality is top-notch. There were some hiccups early in manufacturing the trucks, but these hiccups have since been resolved. 

The one issue that plagued Theeve trucks is the bottom Bones bushings tend to bulge out, pop out, and/or de-core after only a short amount of use. This is most prevalent with the medium (yellow core) Bones bushings. The hard (black core) Bones bushings tend to bulge and pop out less, but they can fail, too, it is just a matter of time. Theeve's current fix for this issue is a redesigned yoke with a more prominent lower lip as well as correcting the geometry by adding a bottom washer. Theeve trucks were initially designed using standard single action bushing specifications. Single action bushing use bottom and top washers, while Bones bushings ostensibly eliminate the need for a bottom washer. I myself always found that I liked my trucks better when I left the bottom washer on when I switched to Bones bushings - it preserves the geometry as intended. Theeves do slightly better with the bottom washer, but bulging still appears inevitable. More details can be found in my previous posts for Theeve Reviews.

Enough history and talk. So, here we are with a set of Theeve TiH in my favorite and the crowd's favorite size: 5.85. These are 8.5" axles for boards from 8.25" - 8.9". Theeve's axles are typically a bit longer than normal 149 trucks. The Theeve 5.85 hanger is 150mm - not uncommon in this class - and the axles are around 8.6". I will test these as I've tested other Theeves, but I will also throw these into the mix for my ongoing 149 Comparison

Here are the major specifications for the Theeve TiH 5.85 trucks:
Now for some hi-res pictures!









This picture is for those that think that Theeves look like Aces. They kind of look like Aces, but they also kind of look like  Independent 215s. Lots of trucks look like this. My old Gullwings looked like this. Nobody says all modern trucks look like Thunders, do they? Thunder was the first to have the broad-shouldered design.


Another comparison to the Ace 44s. Axle placement is similar, but it is easy to see that the geometry is different.

Another comparison of the TiH to the Ace 44. They really don't look any more similar than any other trucks out there.






Full test coming soon!

59 comments:

  1. I just saw the add of the TiH but didn't pay enough attention to found out that they "try" to fix the bushing problem again.

    I'm asking myself why they don't also "fix" the other Theeve models - or is it a kind of marketing that you should buy the 100 dollar trucks to get bushings that don't bulge out ;)?

    Before I use my ACE 44 - I rebuy a pair of new TiAX V2. In fact of bowl-/ pool- skating they don't turn that good as ACE (ace are awesome in deep turning and stability) but I noticed when it comes to long-distance grinding then Theeve grinds much faster/ longer and I got more control over my board, while grinding, than with Ace trucks. But after 2 sessions - I would say each 3 hours of bowl-/ pool- riding and turning I removed the bushing to take a look and the bottom bushing of the front truck starts to bulge- so you got between bushing "hole" and kingpin some mm of free space and the bushing starts to get loose... so I'll choosed the ACE (my current trucks).

    So I'm very excited about the detailed review and summary after riding them some days in fact of what happend to the theeve-"turning"/ "feeling" with the changed (bushing-) geometry and also did Theeve finaly fixed the "bushing problem".

    Do you know if this "changed" (new) geometry will be available for the TiAX soon? Or just TiH exclusive?

    Cheers,

    Chris

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. The temporary fix is just that: temporary. Theeve is currently working on a V3 for TiAX/CSX. The current TiH and the current Theeve Low have the V3 design with the redesigned yoke and the addition of the bottom washer. The TiAX/CSX mid trucks are currently shipping with a bottom washer to help alleviate the bulging/popping.

      I wish I knew more about the issue, but Theeve is keeping this information secret for now.

      Delete
    2. Oh I didn't know that Theeve Low got also the "newest" "geometry" - I'm excited if the TiH or Low profil are the "new V3" or just for bridge the time since the "real" V3 will be relased. Funny that they currently shipping the V2 with bottom washer- but If I am right, you found out that a bottom washer didn't fixed the bushing problem, right?

      I rode two pairs of theeve 5.85 and 5.25 and both got the issues after riding them.
      It makes me sick that Theeve thread consumers that way - in my eyes they should stop the production, put the V1+V2 away from the market and should spent more time to fix the problem and sell "working" trucks. In my opinion a lot of people who got the bushing problem maybe won't buy anymore Theeves (if you know what I mean).

      Delete
    3. I'm also interested to see what changes they make for the TiAX/CSX V3.

      The Theeve bushing problem kind of sucks, but better replacement bushings are only US$5.95. Take your pick: Thunder or Independent aftermarket bushings. What would be nice is if Theeve lowered the price of their trucks by US$5.95 to compensate customers for the Bones bushings. Theeve is trying to make the Bones bushing collaboration work, but the future appears to be uncertain. Destructo dropped their Bones-licensed design for different bushings after their contract with Bones ran out. The new Destructo bushings are superior to the old Bones-licensed ones.

      Delete
    4. Thank you for your helpful truck reviews. I was holding off on purchasing the TiHs after reading your previous posts, and after your announcement about the V3 redesign I decided to take the plunge today (before ordering online I called to make sure the retailer had the latest version). Looking forward to reading your full test.

      Regards,
      Tony

      Delete
  2. Yeah, Chris, I completely expect to replace the Bones bushings at the end of the first week. I've used many sets of Theeves, and the Bones Bushings only last a week in my experience before they pop and bulge and ruin the turning and stability. I put Indy aftermarket bushings in them in the past, this time I have a set of Thunder 90a bushings to put in the TiH.

    The Ace trucks are really amazing on transition. You really can't go wrong with them on ramps and in bowls. I've heard reports that you'll have to swap out the pivot bushings at some point - when you do, go for Khiro pivot bushings, of course. If you're over 180 pounds or do a lot of big airs, get the hard Khiro pivot bushings, if you are under 179, get the soft.

    Theeves are my favorite park/miniramp/bowl truck, but I always lamented how heavy they felt for street use. It would be really nice if the TiH closed that gap and offered me a true all-around truck.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. "I've heard reports that you'll have to swap out the pivot bushings at some point" -yeah I read that, too.. but thanks for the hint about the Khiro pivot.. I keep my eyes open to find them hopefully on the market.

      Currently I'm doing fine with the ACE... makes a lot of fun to ride them in bowl-/ pool- ... grinding in fact of speed and control is less than Theeve but the turning and stability while smashing throw the bowl and doing deep turns they are unbeatable :)

      Delete
    2. The Aces are "aces", as the British say. Did you get them silver color? The painted black ones I have grind terribly until the paint is worn off, and even then I'm always grinding a little bit of paint as the trucks grind down.

      But, yeah, they turn and have great stability; Aces are great trucks. Sneak preview: the TiH feel like Aces but much, much better. But it took a bit of customization to make the TiH trucks feel that way. Right out of the box, the Aces perform extremely well with no modifications except perhaps tightening the kingpin nut.

      Delete
    3. yeah, you're right.. the grind of the Theeve was since the 1st second perfect... I got the silver aces and till the silver paint is grinded a bit down - they grinds better. I'm not sure why but at the first session I tried at pool... it was really hard to do a circle grind -with the Theeve it was really really easy.

      Currently I upgrade my deck from 8" back to 8.5" deck with 15" WB - for me, best WB size for bowl-/ pool- skating. Also I could get a good price for Flip P2 Saari deck :]

      Btw... the "biggest" German skateshop seems to "felt" the "less selling Theeve trucks" cause 50% of their Theeve trucks are 25 - 50% off. So they price is cheaper than Venture/ Thunder or Indys standard trucks ;)

      Delete
  3. How are the bushings that come with Ace trucks?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. They are very good. It takes about a week for them to break in. At first they get softer, then they firm up again to a hardness a bit harder than stock. The kingpins seem kind of long at first, because I had to tighten the trucks up to get the bushings to stay good when they got softer. But then when the bushings finally broke in, I was able to loosen the kingpin nut back to a point where there weren't so many threads showing over the nut. Threads get caught on coping on 50-50s, and I therefore like my kingpin nut flush with the top of the kingpin bolt.

      Delete
  4. I have some almost brand new 8.5 Theeve Tiking trucks that I will trade for some Ace 44 trucks. If anyone is interested let me know.

    ReplyDelete
  5. Might aswell post my results from your previous theeve truck review here. I swapped the pivot cup bushings to khiro hard small and yeehharr!! the bulging is a thing of the past. I completely forgot all about truck problems so it wasn't on my mind to post up the review. No need to go into much detail but the khiro hard small pivot cups stop the bushing bulge problem on Theeve Tiax (V1?-the version with the same hanger shape as the TIH). Cheers for the advice-problem sorted!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Nice! That's what others report, too. The pivot bushings make all the difference. The hard pivot bushings do the best long term. I've been really harassing Theeve about how effective this pivot bushing swap has been for so many skaters.

      Delete
  6. how much the set cost in canadian dollars and the shipping cost

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I don't know exact costs.
      You can see Theeve's website for online retailers: http://www.theevetrucks.com/buy.html

      I also found: http://www.a51.ca/skateshop/shop/category/theeve/

      Skate Warehouse has a large selection of Theeve trucks and they do ship to Canada: http://www.skatewarehouse.com/internationalshipping.html

      I recommend Skate Warehouse if you can't find a Canadian store.

      Delete
  7. I got the Tiax lows for the new geometry and they're great! They need to wear in a little though because they're making a pop sound sometimes which people say is from the washer or something like that.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. That's great! A lot of people like the TiAX lows. That pop sound you hear is the pivot bushing. When that pop sound goes away, your pivot bushing will be worn out inside. You can then replace the pivot bushing with bushings with a more rounded inside(like Khiro small hard or soft pivot bushings).

      Delete
    2. So when the pop goes away I will need a new bushing or it will just be properly worn? Also I was looking at Khiro's, what shape would fit the tiax lows best?

      Thanks
      ~Joe

      Delete
    3. Well, that will be your choice. The pivot bushing will be completely worn smooth. It will offer no more cushioning or centering for the truck's pivot and hanger. Skateboard trucks are designed to withstand high forces - forces much higher than your weight. So, a worn out pivot bushing will only really affect the precision and balance of the truck. Some skaters like the feel of worn down bushings.

      If you replace the Theeve pivot bushings, go with Khiro small.

      Delete
  8. when i click on your photo of the trucks, i am able to browse through all photos on this post. is that automatic in blogger or did u dl some script for this. thanks!

    great post! i dont understand how they redesigned the yoke? what is the yoke?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. That photo gallery slideshow is a feature of blogger.

      The yoke is the area around the "hole" in the hanger, through which the kingpin goes.

      Delete
  9. l also had the same experience as another commenter, wearing completely through the stock pivot cup and getting the clanky 'daewon' loose truck effect (I actually love it!). Its been like that for a long while, and I'm happy. Maybe thats why I didn't have to replace the bushings as often as everyone else??? I think I went through 2 or 3 sets of bushings a year.

    Anyway, my set of v1 TIAX are over three years old, riding them since Jan 09 and they've served me well, time to be replaced as they're almost ground to the axle. Moving up to the TiH, can't wait. I'll ride them stock to see how they feel and then either hack up the pivot cup or try the khiro like everyone has mentioned. Love Theeve trucks, former indy rider (2000-2009, ventures before that).

    ReplyDelete
  10. I got the theeve's when they first came out and had the bulged problem within 4 days of skating. so what I did was swap out the yellow bottom for a black and kept the yellow top. Not had any bulges since and kept most of the yellow feel. I dont know if anyone else has tried this but Ill be interested to know if its a good solution or not.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. i've been riding the hard black bones for a couple months with no poppage. And for a 190 pound fool, medium=wheelbite, hard=plenty of turnyness.

      Delete
    2. Awesome! A lot of people have had good results with the Bones hard bushings.

      Delete
  11. Looking forward to Part 7... Enying the reviews immensely, great to see some rigorous comparison on the go. I'm tempted to get some TiH 5.85's just now to replace my Ace 44's, but feel I should hang on for your thoughts first... Cheers, Paul from Edinburgh

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hey Paul,
      Thanks for commenting. Part 7 is coming out soon. The TiH trucks are interesting, to say the least.
      Are you currently skating the Ace 44s with the magnesium baseplates?

      Delete
    2. Just the stock baseplates right now, but I changed the pivot bushings to Khiro small hard and it made a great difference - the audible click disappeared and the transition from mellow to tight turning was much smoother.

      What do the magnesium baseplates do for you?

      Delete
    3. The magnesium baseplates are lighter. One of the things that makes the Theeve TiH trucks so interesting is that they are really, really light. If you're going from standard Ace 44s to the Theeve TiH, the lightness might be something you'd need to adjust to. If you were already skating Ace's magnesium baseplates, it wouldn't be such an adjustment for you.

      Delete
  12. Interesting thought... I never imagined lightness as a potential hurdle, though I guess it would affect the swing weight of a board and so on.

    I really like my Ace 44's, but I've noticed that they have a noticeable curve to the whole truck, axle and all. I haven't figured out if this is a problem or not - I skate mostly bowls after all, which have plenty of complex concave surfaces.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It does affect the swing weight, like moving to a lighter bat in baseball. It is funny, but a lot of skaters on silverfish longboard forums are of the opinion that Ace trucks feel best once they get a good axle curve established. So, keep that in mind - it might be helping you out more than you know in the bowls!

      Delete
  13. I think titanium parts are great. And theeve titanium parts are really cheap. I testet the TiHs of a friend of mine. The TiH hangers were very slow grinding on steel. I had to lean back a fair amount. I dont like that thats why i cant approve them for street skating. Funny thing is they came with massive steel kingpins and nuts. Hahahahaha. The replacement kingpins are pretty hard to get. The nuts are all steel. The ti bolts are also veeery rare. I have not found them for sale in europe untill today.

    other titanium things I would like to buy:

    kinpin nuts
    axle nuts
    spacers
    bearing housings
    Washers (for those who dont want to use insert bushings)
    7/8 Phillips head bolts (maybe existent but not available)

    Maybe they dont have the capability to provide this stuff at reasonable prices?
    Or they havent thought of it jet.
    It would be great to have these things on the market because theeve titanium parts are realy cheap in comparison to other titanium parts i have seen. And almost every skater could use them. Also those who dont ride theeve.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Titanium is indeed an inexpensive metal, but it is very hard on the tools used to mill it. Nobody ever has the Theeve titanium mounting hardware in stock. It is like a joke now that the Theeve riders snatched them all up.
      I don't like the way the TiH hangers grind on steel. You can't grind locks into them, so it is like the trucks are always new, and they slide side to side on the rail. I've really come to rely on my locks over the years, especially for crooked grinds and 5-0 grinds.

      Delete
    2. Yeah the hanger is casted so you dont have to mill alot maybe. But screw threads are milled most likely. 25€ for 2 kingpins is ultra cheap in comparison to screw sets of 5 pieces for a motor block that cost 500€. I just read that most of the worlds ti resources are in australia. I think thats part of the reason why theeve is so cheap.

      Delete
  14. Have you ever tried the khiro aluminium insert bushings? Maybe nice.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I did try them. The aluminum deformed and crushed up after only a few weeks of skating. The aluminum cores split from the urethane bushing. I ride medium-loose to loose trucks, and I was skating the yellow conicals with the inserts.

      Delete
    2. You just saved me 15€. Thanks.

      Nobody pointed this out jet but i think but there is a little mistake in you description i think. The TiH baseplate is made from alloy that is mainly alluminium. Only the hanger is 6/4 titanium alloy that is 90% titanium. 6/4 titanium is even stronger than 100% solid titanium. The rest of the Theeve line has only 6/4 titanium axles while the rest of these trucks is made of normal aluminium alloy. Exept newest ti kingpin line that also feature 6/4 titanium alloy kingpin. right? ;)

      Delete
    3. SGT Stedenko, you are correct. So much talk about the hangers, I forgot to mention the baseplates.

      Delete
  15. is there anyway to tell the v3 tikings from v2s? i have some v2 tiax that i like enough. that id upgrade to the v3 kings if i can figure out how to tell them apart.. ??

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. The V3 Theeve TiAX and CSX trucks have bottom washers. The V3 Theeve TiH has a bottom washer and a more pronounced retaining lip on the bottom of the yoke.

      Delete
  16. where did you get??? it is impossible to find this truck TiH 5.85!!!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Wow, you're right! I looked around the internet and could not find any Theeve TiH 5.85s in stock anywhere.

      I got this set of 5.85 from Skate Warehouse in San Luis Obispo, CA: http://www.skatewarehouse.com

      For what it's worth: although the TiH truck hangers will last you many years, in practice the TiAX trucks are just as good as the TiH. The lighter weight of the TiH didn't make a difference in performance in the 5.85 size. A truck's actual weight and perceived heft (how heavy the trucks feel to you) are sometimes vastly different. With Tensors, the weight difference between the aluminum and magnesium trucks is noticeable immediately and forever after. The magnesium trucks feel light as air and make a difference in performance: ollie height is definitely higher, flip and varial tricks are easier to spin and control, even little shuffle adjustments while grinding are easier with the Tensor magnesiums. But with the TiH 5.85, the only difference I ever noticed was that they were more slippery on metal coping and metal grind bars. My ollie height, responsiveness, and accuracy was all the same with TiH, TiAX, and TiKING in the 5.85 size. It wasn't until I skated a set of 5.85 CSX that I noticed the extra weight, and the board started falling away from under my feet because of the increased sprung weight.

      So, search away for the TiH 5.85 if what you want is long, long, extremely long truck hanger life. If all you want is less weight, then you'd be better off with the TiAX or TiKING and using the leftover money to buy another deck. We always need another deck.

      Delete
    2. That said, if you send your email address to rlouisd@gmail.com, I will keep a lookout and let you know when and where some Theeve TiH 5.85s are in stock.

      Delete
    3. Thanks I will send you an email! my next truck will be TiH 5.85

      Delete
  17. Hi Bertrand, I have a set of Theeve TiH with the Titanium Kingpin inserted up for auction,

    http://www.ebay.com/itm/120960772274?ssPageName=STRK:MESELX:IT&_trksid=p3984.m1555.l2649

    Or i guess if your readers see this you guys might be interested in them. im auctioning them off because im finding i dont wear down trucks as fast as people normally do, and i bought these a while ago - my current trucks that are thunders are still holding up and look like they'll be fine for another year...so off goes my Theeves if any one is interested. Brand new never worn. bought everything for around 150.00 pluss taxes and shipping, but get them from me cheaper.

    Keep skating~

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you. Did you happen to weigh those trucks?

      Delete
  18. By the way - my auction is for the 5.85 size

    ReplyDelete
  19. damn they're all boxed up.. but with the titanium kingpin i weighed them a while ago. and they were damn near the tiH 5.25 and 5.5 trucks weight. i cant remember.. maybe like 289 grams or 290 somthing... but i remember they where under the 300 mark.

    ReplyDelete
  20. Another thing to look at for weight reduction are wheels. I switched to Almost Hollow Core Wheels. They stay white if you get the white wheels, they are a great urethane, with a sort of plastic core (hard) theyre really not hollow. They are solid. At a weight of only 170g for (4) 50mm wheels combined.

    I normally skate bones or spitfire and a 50mm F1 weighs around 240 - 250 grams combined.

    So people out there skating those big Decks 8.5 and bigger, wanting a board as light as those 7.75's or 8's... Id buy your normal deck with Tensors Mag 10 or Theeve TiH, and get the Almost Wheels. My board isnt so beast anymore. And weight for bigger board riders does matter. Most pros are admitting 149ers are too big and heavy...so weight does matter if you want to have more freedom to progress faster.

    ReplyDelete
  21. a question for you, which might have a very simple answer.

    just got the tih 5.85s and in addition bought ti kingpins and ti bolts. i'm trying to replace what look like steel kingpins that came with the 5.85s to the ti hollow ones. how would one go about that. i tried gently hammering the kingpin from top while laying the base plate on a weight with a hole on bottom. but no results, the kingpin didn't even budge. should i pound the kingpins like there is no tomorrow? how about inserting the hollow kingpins? i don't want to damage the kingpins or the baseplates in the process of replacing the kingpins.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Proceed cautiously! The stock steel kingpins are very difficult to remove from new baseplates, and the ti kingpins are nearly impossible to pound in to new baseplates. You have a couple of options:
      1. Are you in the United States? If so, I will send you a set of loaner baseplates and you send me your baseplates and the kingpins, and I'll press the titanium kingpins in for you. Then I send your baseplates and stock kingpins back, and you send me my loaner baseplates back.
      2. Do you have access to a 1-ton or stronger arbor press? That's what you will need to press the titanium kingpins in without modifying the baseplate.
      3. If you want to go about it yourself, say so and I will give you instructions for doing the kingpin swap with hand tools.

      Don't worry! It is completely doable, it just takes effort and precision.

      Delete
    2. The Bertrand, thanks for your prompt reply, bro...

      yes I am in the states, new york city to be exact...i don't know that i have access to a 1-ton arbor press unless i go to a local skateshop or someone's workshop, which is not impossible...where are you, australia? i ask when i consider sending the plates and pins to you...how much would all that cost: your labor and services and shipping. you would not need to send me loaner plates since i have a few boards at my dispose and considering that it is snowing here and really cold, so not too much skateboarding being done presently....this is a new set up is for the upcoming spring.

      on another note, if i want to go on this devil modification mission solo, what are the instructions, my man?

      thanks, i appreciate it...

      Delete
    3. I'm in Maryland, so I'm right down the road. I would press your kingpins for free, no labor, maybe you'd cover shipping, shouldn't be but a couple of dollars each way.
      As for how to modify the baseplates, I would like to do an instructional for that, so I'll put together some photos and gifs to instruct everybody. Look for the instructional this Saturday night. Then you can decide if you want to ship your baseplates or do it yourself.

      Delete
    4. sounds good Bertrand...

      looking forward to seeing that instructional...

      Delete
  22. You didn't skate the trucks at all? The pictures look like brand new. But the trucks look like the Ace 44, very popular. How much was grinding doing when you do like bars and rails?

    ReplyDelete
  23. Skated a pair of TIH's the first time today. People are certainly not exaggerating when they say that they're sticky on grinds. Smooth metal, marble or concrete... Doesn't matter.

    Otherwise they have that great turn and pop I wanted them for. Had a pair of Tiax's, but got a refund since they kept breaking my bearings (3-5 bearings a session) due to having thinner than average axels. The bearings did not lock into place adequately. I loved them otherwise and thought they were the best trucks I've ever ridden. Turn and pop was spot on.

    It's a shame about the TIH though. I thought I'd get 'the' truck and be done with it (been going through a bunch of different models and brands, not to mention bushing combinations as well). Never thought I'd run into a problem with grinding. Losing my confidence on high speed nose grinds, crooks and different variations. I like how they slide though, at least vs. Thunders.
    They might've smoothed out a bit toward the end of the session, but it also might've been me getting used to how they behave and shifting my weight accordingly. Not to mention the extra speed I needed for everything.

    Waiting for the V3 Tiking now!

    By the way, thanks for your blog Bertrand. I like your OCD, but logical and scientific approach to skating gear. I'm similar and get often frustrated with discussing really anything about this stuff with skaters.

    -K

    ReplyDelete
  24. By the way, thanks for your blog Bertrand. I like your OCD, but logical and scientific approach to skating gear. I'm similar and get often frustrated with discussing really anything about this stuff with skaters.

    ReplyDelete
  25. This is a nice blog post which is very informative and useful, Thank you !

    Buy Online Electric Skateboards

    ReplyDelete